Category Archives: Leadership development

#Motivational “Confidence”

8 Scientifically-Backed Ways To Feel More Confident (Even When You’re Not)

Posted: 09/01/2014 10:17 am EDT Updated: 4 hours ago
CONFIDENCE

Confidence: Highly coveted, yet often elusive. We dedicate time and energy to cultivating the feeling so we can tap into it when we need it most: at work, in business meetings, on dates, during tough conversations. Fortunately, there are a few science-backed tricks to get us there (even when we totally don’t feel it).

If you’re feeling less-than-stellar, these simple, actionable tips will help you fake it ’til you make it:

For starters, stand tall.
standing tall

Tall, correct posture is the hallmark outer sign of confidence — and research shows standing up straight will help you feel it on the inside, too. A study published in the journal Psychological Science showed that a tall, expansive posture helps you act and feel more powerful than more drawn-in stances. As social psychologist and body language researcher Amy Cuddy explains in her TED Talk, your posture can also increase confidence-boosting testosterone in the body and be a potential indicator of success.

Dig out that old rap album.
listening headphones

Getting ready to request a raise or ask someone out on a date? Just press “play.” Researchers from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University found that listening to bass-heavy tunes may have the power to make you feel more confident.

Recall a time you were powerful.

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Good Followers Become Great Leaders

“[Good followers] support and aid the leader when he or she is doing the right thing, and stand up to the leader–having the courage to let the leader know when he or she is doing something wrong or headed in the wrong direction,” says Ronald E. Riggio, Ph.D., associate dean of the faculty at the Kravis Leadership Institute at Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, California.

Leadership

Being a good follower doesn’t make you a “sheep,” Kellerman says. The truth is that most of us are in follower roles regularly, perhaps in our families, social circles, religions, or other settings. Here are five skills you learn as a good follower that make you a better leader.

Awareness.

Today, leaders need to be aware of various audiences including colleagues, coworkers, customers, board members, and the public at large. As a leader, you need to be aware of what it takes to “bring them along.”

Being a follower teaches you how to be aware of the needs of other people as well as their potential to “make my life hell from one second to the next,” she says. Good followers learn to read people and understand what upsets and motivates them.

Diplomacy.

When good followers encounter a co-worker with rabid political beliefs or a disagreeable manager, they’re probably not going to fight every battle, Kellerman says. Playing the part of the follower is easier, simpler, and often less risky.

Good followers learn how to get along with those who have differences while not ignoring those differences. That’s an important leadership trait, too, because a leader or manager can’t afford to be oblivious to the attitudes of those around him or her, Kellerman says.

Courage.

Being a good follower means having the courage to dissent if you think your leader, manager, or superior, is doing something wrong-headed, Kellerman says. That’s not always easy, but it requires the guts and strength of conviction that are essential to good leadership, Kellerman says.

“Being a good follower is complicated in ways that are rather similar to being a good leader. It means being engaged. It means paying attention. It means having the courage to speak up when something’s wrong and it means having the energy and activism to support a leader or manager who’s doing things wisely and well,” she says.

Collaboration.

In many ways, followers can “make or break” the leader influencing if and how goals are accomplished, Riggio says. In many business sectors, followers are the ones who are doing much of the creative work, although the leader may get most of the credit. Leaders who have been good followers understand how to work with people to bring out the best in them.

“Did Steve Jobs really create the iPod and iPhone, or was it the creative collective of team members at Apple? Today, leaders may be evaluated not only by how much is produced or achieved, but by the quality of the team or organization and its members,” he says.

Critical thinking.

In order to be a good follower, you need to be able to think for yourself. Riggio says the best followers support and aid the leader when he or she is doing the right thing, and stand up to the leader when he or she is headed in the wrong direction.

“Many of the same qualities that we admire in leaders–competence, motivation, intelligence–are the same qualities that we want in the very best followers.

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